MASSIVE MANHUNT in Los Angeles for Ex-LAPD officer Christopher Dorner/ Was reported that his body was found in a flaming cabin/ Christopher Dorner's body positively ID'd/Died of Self-Inflicted Gunshot to his Head.

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Normal Re: MASSIVE MANHUNT in Los Angeles for Ex-LAPD officer Christopher Dorner/ Was reported that his body was found in a flaming cabin/ Christopher Dorner's body positively ID'd/Died of Self-Inflicted Gunshot to his Head.

Post by Wrapitup on Wed Feb 13, 2013 7:10 pm

I doubt they would go if there was a scintilla of a thought he was still alive.

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Normal Re: MASSIVE MANHUNT in Los Angeles for Ex-LAPD officer Christopher Dorner/ Was reported that his body was found in a flaming cabin/ Christopher Dorner's body positively ID'd/Died of Self-Inflicted Gunshot to his Head.

Post by Wrapitup on Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:17 pm

LMAO, Raine!!! I can so relate! thinking

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Normal Karen, Jim Reynolds Claim Chris Dorner Tied Them Up, Stole Their Car (VIDEO)

Post by raine1953 on Thu Feb 14, 2013 11:23 am

LOS ANGELES -- He styled himself as a Rambo-like guerrilla, someone trained to outwit and outshoot the police at every turn, and while Christopher Dorner left no doubt he could be unforgivingly violent, when it came to keeping ahead of the law during his deadly rampage, he made one mistake after another.

The last one – letting one of two people he tied up get to her cellphone and call police as he made off in their purple car – tipped authorities he was coming.

The angry ex-cop, who authorities say boasted that police agencies had no chance of capturing him except on his terms, appears to have been killed Tuesday in a fierce gun battle after he wrecked two getaway cars and had to make a last stand in a mountain cabin 80 miles east of Los Angeles.

The cabin went up in flames after authorities launched pyrotechnic tear gas canisters into it, and authorities were all but certain the charred body found inside afterward was Dorner's. They are waiting for forensic tests to confirm that, but in the meantime San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon said Wednesday that authorities consider the hunt over.

Personal effects, including Dorner's driver's license, were found with the body, an official briefed on the search told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the investigation was ongoing.

Sheriff's deputies were not trying to burn down the cabin with Dorner inside but simply flush him out, McMahon said.

"It was not on purpose," he told reporters Wednesday. "We did not intentionally burn down that cabin to get Mr. Dorner out."

Karen and Jim Reynolds said they came face to face with Dorner around noon on the day of his downfall. The couple said that they found him in their cabin-style condominium just a stone's throw from the sheriff's command post, and believe he had been there since Friday.

The couple said Dorner bound them, put pillow cases over their heads and fled in their purple Nissan. When he did, Karen Reynolds managed to get to her cellphone and call 911. The Reynolds told their story at a news conference Wednesday night, they said, to clear up recent reports that it was two female housekeepers who had found Dorner and been tied up.


Their account could not immediately be confirmed by law enforcement officials, but it matched earlier reports saying it was a married couple, and property records showed them as the owners.

The manhunt, one of the largest in recent memory, began last week after Dorner was linked to the killings of a former Los Angeles police captain's daughter and her fiance.

Soon after the couple was found shot death near their Orange County condo, authorities linked their killings to a long, rambling rant they say Dorner posted on Facebook vowing to get revenge on the Los Angeles police and their families for ruining his reputation by firing him.

Dorner was dismissed for filing a false report wrongly accusing his training officer of kicking a mentally disabled man.

"I will bring unconventional and asymmetrical warfare to those in LAPD uniform whether on or off duty," Dorner had boasted. "You will now live the life of the prey."

As it turned out, none of Dorner's four victims were Los Angeles police officers. The other two were a Riverside officer he ambushed at a traffic light and a San Bernardino sheriff's deputy killed in Tuesday's firefight.

"If you're really trying to kill all those people, if that's really your plan, and you're a great tactician, then you don't tell people," said Jim Clemente, a retired behavioral analyst for the FBI. "You don't tell LAPD in advance so they can put a bunch of bodyguards on people. He went and killed soft targets, innocent citizens who had nothing to do with him at all. He used those to scare people, and he used those sadistically to harm the LAPD officer he wanted to get at."

After the first two killings, Dorner tried to steal a boat in San Diego and flee to Mexico, but the former Navy veteran tangled a rope in the outboard motor and couldn't start it, authorities said. Then he fled to the Big Bear Lake resort area, where his truck axle broke, stranding him on Feb. 7, just ahead of a heavy snowstorm.

He may have caught a break when he found refuge in a vacant vacation cabin just across the street from a command post established for the hundreds of officers frantically searching for him.

Despite a search that involved helicopters and bloodhounds and officers going door-to-door checking hundreds of cabins, Dorner remained out of sight until he was discovered Tuesday at the cabin near the command post.

San Bernardino County Deputy Chief Steve Kovensky said searchers had not seen any forced entry when they checked it, but he could not provide details about exactly when that check was made.

Authorities, for the most part, looked at cabins boarded up for the winter, said Dan Sforza, assistant chief of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and often didn't enter occupied homes where nothing appeared amiss.

As he fled in the Nissan, Dorner managed to elude authorities for a time by pulling behind two school buses and making a quick turn onto a mountain road. But he crashed the car there and had to steal another.

That's when he confronted Rick Heltebrake, a ranger who takes care of a Boy Scout camp nearby, and took his pickup. Heltebrake was checking the perimeter of the camp for anything out of the ordinary when he saw Dorner emerge from behind some trees. He was dressed in military fatigues and holding a semi-automatic-style rifle.

"I don't want to hurt you. Start walking and take your dog," Heltebrake recalled Dorner saying as he pointed the gun at him. He fled with his 3-year-old Dalmatian, Suni, and immediately called police, who quickly found the suspect again.

This time he opened fire as he drove past a car carrying game wardens looking for him. One of them got out of his own vehicle and returned fire from his high-powered, semi-automatic rifle but apparently missed.

Out of options after crashing the pickup, the driver made a break for a cabin and barricaded himself inside, where he made his last stand.

Dorner's mother released a family statement to the FOX affiliate in Los Angeles disavowing her son's actions in his final weeks.

"It is with great sadness and heavy hearts that we express our deepest sympathies and condolences to anyone that suffered losses or injuries resulting from Christopher's actions. We do not condone Christopher's actions," said the statement Nancy Dorner gave to KTTV-TV. "The family has no further comments and ask that our privacy be respected during this difficult time."


San Bernardino County Sheriff's Deputy Jeremiah MacKay was killed during that final gunfight and another deputy was wounded.

MacKay, a detective who had been with the department 15 years, had a wife, 7-year-old daughter and 4-month-old son, sheriff's officials said. He had spoken to AP just last weekend, saying he hoped Dorner could be taken into custody without any more violence.

"You just never know if the guy's going to pop out or where he's going to pop out," MacKay told an AP reporter. "We're hoping this comes to a close without any more casualties."

If Dorner's body is identified, he'll be the final casualty.
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Normal Re: MASSIVE MANHUNT in Los Angeles for Ex-LAPD officer Christopher Dorner/ Was reported that his body was found in a flaming cabin/ Christopher Dorner's body positively ID'd/Died of Self-Inflicted Gunshot to his Head.

Post by Wrapitup on Thu Feb 14, 2013 11:53 am

How could this couple "start walking" if they had pillow cases over their heads and were tied up?? FGS!!

Just Happy he is DEAD!

Thanks for the above, Raine!

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Normal Re: MASSIVE MANHUNT in Los Angeles for Ex-LAPD officer Christopher Dorner/ Was reported that his body was found in a flaming cabin/ Christopher Dorner's body positively ID'd/Died of Self-Inflicted Gunshot to his Head.

Post by raine1953 on Thu Feb 14, 2013 12:11 pm

She got out of the restraints and took the pillow cases off their heads. ROFLMAO ROFLMAO ROFLMAO I can just picture them walking around like zombies with pillow cases on their heads. Wrap you're killing me! ROFLMAO ROFLMAO ROFLMAO
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Normal Re: MASSIVE MANHUNT in Los Angeles for Ex-LAPD officer Christopher Dorner/ Was reported that his body was found in a flaming cabin/ Christopher Dorner's body positively ID'd/Died of Self-Inflicted Gunshot to his Head.

Post by Wrapitup on Thu Feb 14, 2013 1:24 pm

We should NOT be laughing but I cannot help it. The mental picture of that is too much!!

Dorner was in hurry..thank Goodness..he didn't tie them up that well.

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Normal Christopher Dorner's body positively ID'd

Post by raine1953 on Thu Feb 14, 2013 7:38 pm

(CNN) -- Medical examiners have positively identified the body of the renegade former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner, the man authorities say killed four people and wounded three others in a vendetta against his old comrades.
That announcement from the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department came two days after a shootout, standoff and fire at a cabin in the mountains east of Los Angeles. Dorner's remains were identified through dental records during an autopsy, the department said.
The charred remains of a man believed to be Dorner were found in the burned cabin late Tuesday. The cause of death was not released with the identification.
Dorner was fired from the Los Angeles Police Department in 2009 for falsely accusing his training officer of kicking a subdued suspect. After unsuccessfully challenging his dismissal in court, police say, he launched a campaign of guerrilla warfare against the LAPD, targeting numerous officers involved in his case and their families.

Dorner was cornered and died Tuesday afternoon in the San Bernardino Mountains, about 100 miles east of the city he had once sworn to protect and serve.

The 33-year-old former Navy officer holed up in the cabin after a shootout with law enforcement that left a sheriff's deputy dead and another wounded, San Bernardino Sheriff John McMahon said. The cabin caught fire when police shot tear gas canisters into it, he told reporters Wednesday.

Although the canisters included pyrotechnic tear gas, which generates heat, "We did not intentionally burn down that cabin to get Mr. Dorner out," he said.

The city of Los Angeles and other communities in southern California had issued a $1 million reward for information leading to Dorner's capture and conviction. What to do with that reward was under discussion Thursday, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and LAPD Chief Charlie Beck said.

"More than 20 jurisdictions and entities are involved in this reward, so all of them will be coming together to collectively determine whether any individual or individuals qualify for it,'" they said in a joint statement. "Our personal hope is that the reward will be distributed, but we must follow the rules and respect the procedures of each entity."
Dorner's mother, Nancy Dorner, expressed condolences for the victims in a statement given to Robin Sax at Fox 11 Los Angeles.
"It is with great sadness and heavy hearts that we express our deepest sympathies and condolences to anyone that suffered losses or injuries resulting from Christopher's actions. We do not condone Christopher's actions.
The family has no further comments and ask that our privacy be respected during this difficult time."
Dorner was first named a suspect in two shooting deaths on February 3: Monica Quan, the daughter of his police union representative, and her fiance, Keith Lawrence.
Police say he then killed Michael Crain, a police officer in suburban Riverside, and wounded Crain's partner in an ambush on their patrol car February 7. They say he also wounded an LAPD officer who chased him into nearby Corona.
In addition, LAPD officers guarding one of Dorner's targets in suburban Torrance opened fire on a pickup truck that resembled Dorner's, wounding two women inside. Beck called the shooting "tragic" and "horrific."
In a manifesto announcing his planned rampage, Dorner said nothing had changed in the LAPD since its scandals of the 1990s, the Rodney King beating and the Rampart police corruption case. Those allegations have struck a chord with some who say that, despite the four killings, Dorner was seeking justice.
Shadowed by that history, Beck announced Saturday that the department would re-examine its proceedings against Dorner. The review is "not to appease a murderer," but "to reassure the public that their police department is transparent and fair in all things we do," he said.
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Normal Re: MASSIVE MANHUNT in Los Angeles for Ex-LAPD officer Christopher Dorner/ Was reported that his body was found in a flaming cabin/ Christopher Dorner's body positively ID'd/Died of Self-Inflicted Gunshot to his Head.

Post by Wrapitup on Thu Feb 14, 2013 9:52 pm

Burned remains ID'd as fugitive ex-cop Dorner
By TAMI ABDOLLAH and HAVEN DALEY | Associated Press – 3 hrs ago

BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. (AP) — Officials said Thursday that the burned remains found in a California mountain cabin have been positively identified as fugitive former police officer Christopher Dorner.

Jodi Miller, a spokeswoman for the San Bernardino County sheriff-coroner, said the identification was made through Dorner's dental records.

Miller did not give a cause of death.I would think he burned to death..maybe he shot himself first and then burned.

The search for Dorner began last week after authorities said he had launched a deadly revenge campaign against the Los Angeles Police Department for his firing, warning that he would bring "warfare" to LAPD officers and their families.

The manhunt brought police to Big Bear Lake, 80 miles east of Los Angeles, where they found Dorner's burned-out pickup truck abandoned. His footprints disappeared on frozen soil and hundreds of officers who searched the area and checked out each building failed to find him.

Five days later, but just a stone's throw from a command post authorities had set up in the massive manhunt, Karen and Jim Reynolds said they came face to face with Dorner inside their cabin-style condo.

The couple said Dorner bound them and put pillowcases on their heads. At one point, he explained that he had been there for days.

"He said 'I don't have a problem with you, so I'm not going to hurt you,'" Jim Reynolds said. "I didn't believe him; I thought he was going to kill us."

Police have not commented on the Reynolds' account, but it renews questions about the thoroughness of a search for a man who authorities declared was armed and extremely dangerous as they hunted him across the Southwest and Mexico.

"They said they went door-to-door but then he's right there under their noses. Makes you wonder if the police even knew what they were doing," resident Shannon Schroepfer said. "He was probably sitting there laughing at them the whole time."

The notion of him holed up just across the street from the command post was shocking to many, but not totally surprising to some experts familiar with the complications of such a manhunt.

"Chilling. That's the only word I could use for that," said Ed Tatosian, a retired SWAT commander for the Sacramento Police Department. "It's not an unfathomable oversight. We're human. It happens. It's chilling (that) it does happen."

Law enforcement officers, who had gathered outside daily for briefings, were stunned by the revelation. One official later looking on Google Earth exclaimed that he'd parked right across the street from the Reynolds' cabin each day.
The Reynolds said Dorner was upstairs in the rental unit Tuesday when they arrived to ready it for vacationers. Dorner, who at the time was being sought for three killings, confronted the Reynolds with a drawn gun, "jumped out and hollered 'stay calm,'" Jim Reynolds said during a Wednesday night news conference.

His wife screamed and ran downstairs but Dorner caught her, Reynolds said. The couple said they were taken to a bedroom where he ordered them to lie on a bed and then on the floor. Dorner bound their arms and legs with plastic ties, gagged them with towels and covered their heads with pillowcases.

"I really thought it could be the end," Karen Reynolds said.
The couple believes Dorner had been staying in the cabin at least since Feb. 8, the day after his burned truck was found nearby. Dorner told them he had been watching them by day from inside the cabin as they did work outside. The couple, who live nearby, only entered the unit Tuesday. "He said we are very hard workers," Karen Reynolds said.

After he fled in their purple Nissan Rogue, she managed to call 911 from a cellphone on the coffee table. Police said Dorner later killed a fourth person, a sheriff's deputy, during a standoff, and died inside the burning cabin where he took cover during a blazing shootout.

While authorities have not corroborated the couple's account, it matched early reports from law enforcement officials that a couple had been tied up and their car stolen by a man resembling Dorner. Property records showed the Reynolds as the condo's owners.

The San Bernardino County sheriff has refused to answer questions about how one of the largest manhunts in years could have missed him.

During the search, heavily armed deputies went door to door to search roughly 600 cabins for forced entry. Many of the cabins were boarded-up summer homes.

Authorities said officers looked for signs that someone had forcibly entered the buildings, or that heat was on inside in a cabin that otherwise looked uninhabited.
Helicopters had landed SWAT officers in a lot near the Reynolds' condo, and through the weekend they stood in plain view from the cabin, gearing up in helmets, bulletproof vests, with assault weapons at the ready.
According to the Reynolds, the cabin had cable TV, and a second-story view that would have allowed him to see choppers flying in and out.

Timothy Clemente, a retired FBI SWAT team leader who was part of the search for Atlanta Olympics bomber Eric Rudolph, said searchers had to work methodically. When there's a hot pursuit, they can run after a suspect into a building. But in a manhunt, the search has to slow down. "You can't just kick in every door," he said. Police have to have a reason to enter a building.

Officers would have been approaching each cabin, rock and tree with the prospect that Dorner was behind and waiting with a weapon that could penetrate bulletproof vests. In his manifesto posted online, Dorner, a former Navy reservist, said he had no fear of losing his life and would wage "unconventional and asymmetrical warfare" and warned officers "you will now live the life of the prey."
Even peering through windows can be difficult because officers have to remove a hand from their weapons to shade their eyes. Experts said it is likely officers may have used binoculars to help examine homes from a distance, especially when dealing with a man who had already killed three people, including a police officer.

In many cases, officers didn't even knock on the doors, according to searchers and residents.

"If Chris Dorner's on the other side of the door, what would the response be?" Clemente said. "A .50 caliber round or .223 round straight through that door."

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Normal Re: MASSIVE MANHUNT in Los Angeles for Ex-LAPD officer Christopher Dorner/ Was reported that his body was found in a flaming cabin/ Christopher Dorner's body positively ID'd/Died of Self-Inflicted Gunshot to his Head.

Post by Wrapitup on Fri Feb 15, 2013 8:21 pm


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Normal Christopher Dorner Cause Of Death: Ex-Cop Killed By Gunshot To Head, Sheriff Says

Post by Wrapitup on Fri Feb 15, 2013 8:25 pm

By TAMI ABDOLLAH 02/15/13 08:18 PM ET EST

SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. — Fugitive ex-cop Christopher Dorner apparently killed himself as the cabin he was barricaded in caught fire following a shootout with officers, police revealed Friday while also confirming he spent most of his time on the run in a condominium just steps away from the command center set up to find him.

"The information that we have right now seems to indicate that the wound that took Christopher Dorner's life was self-inflicted," sheriff's Cpt. Kevin Lacy told reporters at a news conference.

Authorities initially were unsure whether Dorner killed himself, had been struck by a deputy's bullet or had died in a fire that engulfed the cabin during the shootout, which included police sending tear gas canisters inside.

The search for Dorner began last week after authorities said he had launched a deadly revenge campaign against the Los Angeles Police Department for his firing, warning in a manifesto posted on Facebook that he would bring "warfare" to LAPD officers and their families.

Within days he apparently killed four people, including two police officers.

He killed the daughter of a former Los Angeles Police Department captain and her fiance Feb. 3 and later a Riverside police officer he ambushed at a traffic light. He then disappeared into the San Bernardino National Forest four days later, leaving his burned-out truck with a broken axle near the mountain resort of Big Bear Lake. His fourth victim was a sheriff's deputy killed in Tuesday's shootout.

Until then, Dorner had managed to elude one of the largest manhunts in California history, one that employed heat-seeking helicopters and bloodhounds.

Sheriff John McMahon said Friday that authorities now believe Dorner was hiding all that time in a condo within 100 yards of a command post they had set up for the manhunt.

Karen and Jim Reynolds found Dorner inside their vacant cabin-style condo Tuesday when they entered to clean it. The couple had left the door unlocked Thursday for a maintenance man, McMahon said, and that's apparently how Dorner got in, locking the door behind him.

When authorities stopped at the condo during their door-to-door search of the Big Bear Lake area that Thursday night, the door was locked and no one answered, McMahon said.

"Our deputy knocked on that door and did not get an answer, and in hindsight it's probably a good thing that he did not answer based on his actions before and after that event," the sheriff said of Dorner.

When the couple arrived Tuesday, Jim Reynolds said Dorner confronted them with a drawn gun, "jumped out and hollered `stay calm.'"

Dorner bound their arms and legs with plastic ties, gagged them with towels and covered their heads with pillowcases and fled in their purple Nissan, but Karen Reynolds soon got free and called 911.

"I really thought it could be the end," she said afterward.

Law enforcement officers, who had gathered outside the cabin for daily for briefings, were stunned that Donner was watching from just across the street. One official later looking on Google Earth exclaimed that he'd parked right across the street from the Reynoldses' condo each day.

Timothy Clemente, a retired FBI SWAT team leader who was part of the search for Atlanta Olympics bomber Eric Rudolph, said searchers had to work methodically. When there's a hot pursuit, they can run after a suspect into a building. But in a manhunt, the search has to slow down and police have to have a reason to enter a building.

"You can't just kick in every door," he said.

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Normal Sources: Ex-cop Dorner tried to charm fishermen into taking him to Mexico

Post by Wrapitup on Mon Feb 18, 2013 11:43 am



By Chris Chan and Wendy Fry, NBCSanDiego.com

Ex-LAPD officer-turned-fugitive Christopher Dorner, who went on a deadly shooting rampage and then died after a shootout and fire last week, first tried to charm fishermen in San Diego’s Driscoll Wharf into giving him a ride to Mexico, sources said.

Dorner, 33, led authorities on a massive manhunt after allegedly killing an Irvine couple and a Riverside police officer in a crime spree across Southern California that began on Feb. 3.

Dorner's deadly crimes were allegedly part of a revenge-filled plot he outlined in an online manifesto targeting law enforcement officers and their families.

Authorities searched for Dorner all over Southern California -- from Irvine to National City -- and led extensive checkpoints at the San Ysidro border, believing Dorner was trying to flee into Mexico.

Fishermen at Driscoll Wharf told NBC 7 exclusively that Dorner was on the pier near Nimitz and Harbor Island Drive on Feb. 5 trying to charm his way into a boat ride to Mexico.

“He kept saying he wanted to go fishing off Mexico. I said ‘Mexico? That’s kinda weird. You could go fishing on the bay,’” said Jeremy Smith, a local commercial fisherman.

Smith and others at the dock said Dorner was willing to pay $200 to $400 for someone to take him out to sea. He told the fishermen he was going to be deployed to Afghanistan and just wanted to go fishing in Mexico first.

But at this pier, far away from popular fishing charters, most people were making repairs on their boats, not ready to go to sea.

Smith offered to show him around a luxury yacht that was for sale docked at the pier. But he asked him to remove the military style boots Dorner was wearing to keep the white carpeting clean. Dorner declined.

"Maybe he had a gun," Smith guessed. "Usually people want to see inside."

Dorner's request for a ride surprised some local fishermen, including Roy Sherman.

“I’ve been down here for 40 years and he’s the first guy that came down here and asked for a ride,” said Sherman.

San Diego Police Lt. Andra Brown said she was not aware of this particular Dorner sighting in San Diego.
“We’re not going to discuss details of an ongoing investigation,” Brown said, and referred questions about the incident to the Irvine Police Department.

Several other law enforcement sources -- not in the San Diego Police Department -- confirmed the man described by local fishermen was likely Dorner.

Dorner did spend time in San Diego between Feb. 4 and Feb. 6.

Gift of fish tacos
A surveillance video taken behind an auto parts store in National City on Feb. 4 shows Dorner tossing bullets, a uniform and other items that linked him to the Irvine double-homicide into a dumpster.

After spending an hour at the pier the next day, the fishermen said Dorner left, but returned with fish tacos for Smith, hoping that would convince the fisherman to help him find a charter.

The witnesses reported Dorner was very friendly, always with a smile on his face, calling himself "Mike."
The man who called himself "Mike" told Smith a story about a friend who was having problems with the police and said his friend had been fired.

"I think he was talking about himself, now that I think about it," added Smith.

Dorner eventually left peacefully without his ride to Mexico, the group of fisherman said.

Driscoll Wharf is adjacent to Naval Base San Diego on North Harbor drive.

Smith said Dorner returned to the wharf on Feb. 6 but still couldn't find anyone to take him to Mexican waters.
That same day, a man fitting Dorner’s description tried to steal a boat from a San Diego marina, according to officials. An 81-year-old man on the boat was tied up but uninjured. The would-be boat thief was unable to steal the boat and fled.

Karen and Jim Reynolds came face to face with Christopher Dorner when they arrived at their Big Bear cabin to clean it out for renters. NBC's Miguel Almaguer reports.

Later that night, police issued Dorner's description, and the fishermen said they notified authorities of their encounter.

On Sunday, fishermen on Pier 6 at Driscoll Wharf are amazed the kind man who brought them fish tacos on Feb. 5 was the dangerous fugitive accused of fatally shooting four people, including a police officer and a sheriff’s deputy.

The 10-day manhunt for Dorner ended on Feb. 12.

After barricading himself in a Big Bear-area cabin, he died of what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head, San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department officials said. That cabin went up in flames during a shootout between Dorner and officers, and the fugitive's charred remains were later found inside.

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Normal Four People To Split $1 Million Reward In Case Of Rogue Ex-Cop Christopher Dorner

Post by NiteSpinR on Tue May 07, 2013 9:57 pm

May 7, 2013

The vast majority of the $1 million reward offered in the manhunt for rogue ex-cop Christopher Dorner will go to a couple whom he tied up in their Big Bear cabin, police said Tuesday.

The Los Angeles Police Department posted a document on its website in which a panel of three judges detailed the payouts for the much-sought reward.

They decided about $800,000 will go to James and Karen Reynolds. Daniel McGowan, who found Dorner’s burning truck in the Big Bear area where he eventually was discovered, will get $150,000, and $50,000 will go to tow truck driver R.L. McDaniel, who reported spotting Dorner at a gas station earlier in the manhunt.

The $1 million reward was announced by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa during Dorner’s rampage in February.

Dorner had vowed warfare on LAPD officers and their families for what he called an unfair firing. He killed four people, including two law enforcement officers, during his nearly one-week run from authorities that ended with his death on Feb. 12.

A dozen parties came forward claiming they provided the key tip that ultimately led Dorner to hole up in a vacant mountain cabin where he apparently took his own life after a shootout with law enforcement.

The reward was coordinated through more than 30 agencies or entities, including the FBI, the Los Angeles Dodgers and the University of Southern California — but details of the offer were never written down, so it lacked specifics.

The uncertainty and competing legal claims have caused controversy in the months since the manhunt ended. Some entities that contributed money for the reward withdrew their pledges because Dorner wasn’t captured or convicted.

The judges’ memorandum said in awarding the money, they decided the “comparative value of the information provided and how directly it causally led to Dorner’s capture.”

The manhunt was underway Feb. 7 when McDaniel spotted Dorner at an AM/PM gas station in Corona. He was about to call police when he spotted an LAPD squad car and alerted the officers.

“As the officers interviewed Mr. McDaniel, Dorner’s vehicle turned back ... and passed by the AM/PM en route to Interstate 15 northbound. Mr. McDaniel positively identified the truck,” and officers gave chase immediately, according to the document.

That chase led to two shootouts between Dorner and law enforcement. One officer was injured in the first shootout, and one was killed and another was critically wounded in the second.

Dorner then escaped 50 miles northeast to Big Bear, but that wouldn’t be known until the next breakthrough in the investigation, the document said.

McGowan, who works for the Snow Summit ski resort in Big Bear Lake, called authorities Feb. 7 after he spotted a burning truck on the side of a rarely used, unpaved fire route. He called authorities, who discovered the truck belonged to Dorner.

That information initiated an intensive, focused search for Dorner, with hundreds of Southern California law enforcement officials descending on the Big Bear Lake area. Officers went door to door hunting for Dorner in the following days, but it wasn’t until Feb. 12 that they received their next fruitful tip.

Karen Reynolds called authorities to say Dorner had held her and her husband at gunpoint and tied them up before stealing their purple Nissan SUV to escape.

Karen Reynolds identified Dorner, gave the location of the cabin and the Nissan’s description. Less than half an hour later, he was spotted by Fish and Wildlife wardens and a chase ensued.

Dorner then crashed the Reynoldses’ vehicle and carjacked camp ranger Rick Heltebrake, and it was his vehicle that was tracked to a cabin where Dorner later died.

A message seeking comment was left for James Reynolds on Tuesday night.

Heltebrake filed a lawsuit last week seeking the $1 million reward but did not submit a claim under the reward’s process, according to the document. To qualify for the reward, claimants had to have contacted law enforcement and provide information that furthered the investigation and led to capture.


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Normal Re: MASSIVE MANHUNT in Los Angeles for Ex-LAPD officer Christopher Dorner/ Was reported that his body was found in a flaming cabin/ Christopher Dorner's body positively ID'd/Died of Self-Inflicted Gunshot to his Head.

Post by Nama on Tue May 07, 2013 11:04 pm

I'm glad that someone qualified for the reward. Didn't the mayor say, way back when, he wasn't sure that anyone would.

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Normal Re: MASSIVE MANHUNT in Los Angeles for Ex-LAPD officer Christopher Dorner/ Was reported that his body was found in a flaming cabin/ Christopher Dorner's body positively ID'd/Died of Self-Inflicted Gunshot to his Head.

Post by raine1953 on Tue May 07, 2013 11:35 pm

You are right BJ. Then people/agencies that were putting up $$ for the reward started dropping out. Then it looked like it would just go to the guy who was carjacked. I'm especially happy to read above it was decided to split it among those four people, they deserved it. MOO.
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Normal Owners of cabin where Christopher Dorner died to get $200,000

Post by NiteSpinR on Tue Feb 17, 2015 8:58 pm

2/17/15

The owners of the cabin that burned down during the final showdown between ex-LAPD Officer Christopher Dorner and law enforcement in 2013 will be paid $200,000 for their loss.

The cabin in the Angelus Oaks neighborhood of Big Bear burned down Feb. 12, 2013, after the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s SWAT team fired in gas that ignited and consumed the building in fire.

At the time, Dorner was wanted for killing two law enforcement officers and an LAPD commander’s daughter and her fiance in a plot to seek revenge on the department that fired him.

Authorities tracked him to Big Bear, where he remained hidden for nearly a week.

Dorner was spotted trying to make his escape from the mountain and was chased into a cabin belonging to Candace Martin and Eric Funnell – where authorities surrounded him and engaged in a dramatic gun battle that left a San Bernardino County sheriff’s deputy dead.

Dorner shot himself in the cabin’s basement as the building went up in flames.

In a claim against San Bernardino County, Martin and Funnell sought compensation for their cabin, attorneys fees and emotional distress. The $200,000 will be paid out by March 5, according to a copy of the agreement.

The settlement is one of several that public agencies have made in connection with the Dorner manhunt. Two women who were shot by police as they delivered the Los Angeles Times to homes have been compensated along with a man who was shot at by police in Torrance.

Nearly $900,000 in reward money was also paid to people who gave tips that led to finding Dorner.

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