A Fractured Life, a Failed Marriage and 5 Small Bodies in Alabama. Timothy R. Jones Jr., 32, is expected to face murder charges.

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Normal A Fractured Life, a Failed Marriage and 5 Small Bodies in Alabama. Timothy R. Jones Jr., 32, is expected to face murder charges.

Post by Wrapitup on Thu Sep 11, 2014 12:20 am

By ALAN BLINDER and TIMOTHY WILLIAMSSEPT. 10, 2014

LEXINGTON, S.C. — The small sign posted above the doorway of the mobile home seemed starkly at odds with the collection of toys a few feet away: “Is there life after death? Trespass here and find out.”

The terse warning and an accompanying illustration of a handgun hung on the home of Timothy R. Jones Jr., 32, who was expected to face murder charges after his five children were found dead on Tuesday in a rural patch of the Alabama Black Belt. About 400 miles from the scene near Camden, Ala., state officials and neighbors here were grappling on Wednesday with whether they had missed conspicuous signals of imminent family violence.

And Mr. Jones himself emerged as a tragically paradoxical figure: an engineer, once described by a family therapist as “a highly intelligent, responsible father,” who endured an especially bitter divorce and now stands accused of killing his five children and abandoning their bodies, all wrapped in garbage bags. He was arrested hours after he left Alabama, when the authorities stopped his Cadillac Escalade at a checkpoint in Mississippi and found blood and materials to produce methamphetamine.

Days later, the authorities said, he led them to the barren ground, surrounded by tree limbs and red clay, where the bodies of the children rested. The eldest was 8 years old.

“He has not indicated why he did this,” A. Lewis McCarty, the acting sheriff of Lexington County, S.C., said during a news conference on Wednesday morning.

Court records and interviews show that in the years before the deaths of his children, Mr. Jones was leading a fractured life fraught with feelings of betrayal, anxiety and mistrust, even as he earned a salary of more than $70,000 as an engineer for Intel in nearby Columbia.

Mr. Jones married Amber M. Jones in DuPage County, Ill., just west of Chicago, in June 2004 in what was the first marriage for both. But within eight years, court documents show, the two were embroiled in an acrimonious dispute largely centered on Mrs. Jones’s relationship with a 19-year-old neighbor.

Mr. and Mrs. Jones separated for two weeks in May 2012, and when Mr. Jones returned to the home they shared, he found that his wife “was putting the children to bed and then going next door to meet her paramour,” his lawyer wrote in a divorce filing.


Around that time, Mr. Jones began meeting with a marriage and family therapist, Dr. April M. Hames.

According to an affidavit Dr. Hames filed in the Lexington County Family Court in July 2012, Mr. Jones told her that he struggled to trust Mrs. Jones, in part because he had a troubled childhood, including a mother with mental illness. He also accused Mrs. Jones of neglecting their children to the point that the South Carolina Department of Social Services visited the family’s home. “My wife was chastised for maintaining a sloppy, unkempt home,” Mr. Jones said in a 2012 affidavit.

But it was her relationship with the male neighbor that was especially upsetting to Mr. Jones.

“When asked his biggest fear, Mr. Jones stated that he did not want to feel abandoned by his wife,” Dr. Hames wrote. “He did not want to feel unwanted and ‘tossed away without even knowing it.’ ”

The two squabbled over who would care for the children and where they would live. Mr. Jones talked of moving his children to Mississippi, where many of his relatives reside, or relocating elsewhere in South Carolina, away from Mrs. Jones.

Their divorce became final in October 2013, and Mr. Jones, in an agreement with Mrs. Jones, became the custodial parent of the children.

Dr. Hames, whom Mr. Jones had hired, endorsed the approach in her affidavit.

“Mr. Jones is a highly intelligent, responsible father who is capable of caring for his children as the sole custodial parent,” she wrote, adding, “His thoughts are very detailed, action oriented and focused on his children.”

Last month, though, Mr. Jones was questioned by law enforcement officials about a report that he had physically abused at least one child on Aug. 7. The authorities said Wednesday that there were no signs of abuse when they visited the home that day and spoke to Mr. Jones and the children.

Amid the state’s inquiry, Mr. Jones and his children were living in a trailer home at the end of a sand-and-grass road here, part of a small community speckled with “no trespassing” notices. Residents described it as a transient neighborhood, with people rarely staying longer than a year or two and many inclined to keep to themselves.

Still, Mr. Jones and his family were not especially reclusive by the neighborhood’s standards. The children would often play outside — though they had been seen less and less in recent months — and Mr. Jones could be counted on for a wave or a greeting.

“The kids were polite and happy, and they liked to run and laugh and giggle like normal children,” said Heather Gates, whose children sometimes played with Mr. Jones’s. “They seemed well-fed and clean and polite. They seemed normal.”

A box of toys — including a sand pail, a plastic dump truck and an inflatable baseball bat — sat on a small deck leading to the front door of Mr. Jones’s trailer. A brown teddy bear lay below the porch, not far from a yellow folder bearing the name of one child and his elementary school.

Behind the home, trash, including packages of Newport cigarettes and a bag of microwave popcorn, spilled from a tipped-over garbage can.

In a brief telephone interview from Mississippi, where Mr. Jones was being held in Smith County before his expected extradition to South Carolina, his father, Timothy R. Jones Sr., said relatives were stunned by the allegations.

“We just want to try to work through this,” he said. “It’s a very difficult time for the family.”

Sheriff McCarty, speaking in Lexington, described Mrs. Jones as “extremely distraught.” She could not be reached for comment.

Word of the abductions and killings stunned this county of nearly 274,000 people, partly because the authorities did not announce that the children were missing until Tuesday afternoon, nearly six days after Mrs. Jones told investigators she could not reach her former husband.

Officials said Wednesday that they had not issued an Amber Alert because the divorce settlement named Mr. Jones as the primary custodian. But Sheriff McCarty said the state and local authorities, assisted by the F.B.I., had carried out a vigorous search for Mr. Jones and the children.

Mr. Jones was apprehended on Saturday when he encountered a motor vehicle checkpoint in Mississippi, and Sheriff McCarty said Mr. Jones was acting “very strange” and “maybe on the violent side.” He was initially detained for suspicion of driving under the influence and possession of a controlled substance.

When the authorities in Mississippi checked the Escalade’s license plates against a national database, they became aware of the missing children.

Less than three days later, the sheriff said, a calm Mr. Jones walked F.B.I. agents and other law enforcement officials to the children’s bodies.

“I have no idea why he dropped them in Alabama,” Sheriff McCarty said.

Correction: September 10, 2014
An earlier version of this article misstated the distance between Camden, Ala., near where the bodies of five children were uncovered, and Lexington, S.C., where Timothy R. Jones Jr., lives. It is about 400 miles, not about 700.


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Normal Re: A Fractured Life, a Failed Marriage and 5 Small Bodies in Alabama. Timothy R. Jones Jr., 32, is expected to face murder charges.

Post by Wrapitup on Thu Sep 11, 2014 12:23 am

Must-Read!!

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Normal Re: A Fractured Life, a Failed Marriage and 5 Small Bodies in Alabama. Timothy R. Jones Jr., 32, is expected to face murder charges.

Post by Wrapitup on Thu Sep 11, 2014 12:28 am

S.C. dad to be charged with murder in death of 5 kids

LEXINGTON, S.C. - Authorities say a South Carolina man will be charged with murder in the deaths of his five children after he led officials to a secluded clearing in Alabama where their bodies were found wrapped in garbage bags and confessed to killing them.

Acting Sheriff Lewis McCarty of Lexington County, S.C. said Wednesday at a news conference that Timothy Ray Jones Jr., 32, would be charged with five counts of murder when he arrives in South Carolina. Jones is currently being held in Mississippi.

McCarty says authorities believe that Jones killed the five children at the same time, but he did not say specifically why he thought that. He says authorities are not sure of the motive for the killings.

McCarty says autopsies are scheduled to begin Thursday. He says he's unsure when they will be finished, and officials won't comment on any causes of death or release the children's names until then.

McCarty says the children's mother, Jones' ex-wife, is in shock and distraught. The children were ages 1 to 8.

Jones is suspected of having killed the children in South Carolina before wrapping their bodies in garbage bags, placing them in the trunk and driving to Alabama - a trip that is expected to have taken several days, according to McCarty. When the children's bodies were found Tuesday, they were in an advanced stage of decomposition, the sheriff said.

Jones had joint custody of his children with his ex-wife, police said, and had recently told neighbors he and the kids were going to move out of South Carolina.

The 32-year-old was detained in Smith County, Mississippi, on Saturday after being stopped at a motor vehicle checkpoint near Raleigh, Mississippi, and charged with drunken driving. McCarty said Wednesday Jones was arrested after authorities found chemicals used to manufacture methamphetamine and a substance believed to be the street drug Spice, a form of synthetic marijuana, in his car. Cleaning materials and blood were also spotted in the car, according to the sheriff.

"He seemed very strange, maybe somewhat disoriented and a little bit on the violent side," McCarty said of Jones' behavior during the traffic stop.

"[The officers] saw blood. They saw children's clothes, but no children," he continued.

During a background check, police discovered that Jones was wanted in South Carolina "regarding a welfare concern of his children," who were on a national missing persons list. The children had been reported missing by their mother Sept. 3, according to authorities.

Authorities did not issue an Amber Alert because the case didn't meet the criteria - Jones had legal custody of the children, State Law Enforcement Division Chief Mark Keel said.

It wasn't until late Monday when authorities say Jones confessed to deputies that he had killed his children and dumped their bodies. He led them to the location of the bodies on Tuesday.

Officials would not immediately comment on whether there had been previous reports of domestic violence or criminal activity relating to the family. They said they planned to release more information regarding that subject later Wednesday.

Johnny Hyder, a former neighbor of the Joneses in Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina, told the Assocated Press said that when the Joneses lived next door, the children were often dressed in dirty clothes and were seen home at all hours of the day because Tim Jones had said he didn't believe in the public schools. Hyder said Jones was constantly looking for a reason to argue and often threatened to call the police. He said Jones approached him with a gun on his hip one day and was angry about something, but Hyder couldn't remember what it was. When Hyder said he was going to call police, he said Jones told him it was only a BB gun.

"It wasn't a BB gun," Hyder said. "It was a real gun. I know what one looks like, but I didn't want to cause any more trouble."

Johnny Hyder's wife, Marlene, said Jones threatened to kill one of their dogs when it briefly went onto his property.

"He was a nut," she said.

Marlene Hyder said she also remembered a day when one of the Joneses' younger children came over to the Hyders' house and tried to drink out of one of their outdoor spigots. He was dirty and disheveled and ran back to his house when she tried to speak to him, she said.

Authorities said Jones, who they described as a computer engineer, has no history of mental illness.

Jones currently resides in a mobile home south of Lexington. On Wednesday, food and other garbage were piled up outside his door. The yard was overgrown, with broken toys strewn about.

A sign on the front door said, "Is there life after death? Trespass here and find out" with a photo of a gun.

Sheriff McCarty said Monday that the case has certainly left a mark on him and other officials working the case.

"I'm a father and I'm a grandfather and in all my years of law enforcement, I have never seen a case like this. It's hard to work a case with one child or one murder. It's very difficult to work two, but five is extremely hard," McCarty said.

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Normal Re: A Fractured Life, a Failed Marriage and 5 Small Bodies in Alabama. Timothy R. Jones Jr., 32, is expected to face murder charges.

Post by Wrapitup on Sat Sep 13, 2014 11:43 am

[b]Accused child killer Timothy Ray Jones Jr. has suffered mental health issues in the past, attorney says.

on September 12, 2014 at 2:52 PM, updated September 12, 2014 at 2:57 PM

LEXINGTON, South Carolina -- An attorney representing Timothy Ray Jones Jr. says the accused killer of his five children has been treated for mental health issues in the past.

"We have some concerns, obviously, about his mental health. We need to make sure that gets looked at," Attorney Aimee Zmroczek told members of the media following Jones' court hearing this morning, The State reported.

She said Jones is "scared."

Jones is facing five counts of murder following the death of his children, which is believed to have occurred on Aug. 28 at his home in Red Bank, S.C. Jones led authorities to the children's bodies, which authorities say he dumped in rural Oak Hill in Wilcox County, Ala. on Sept. 9.

Court documents showed Jones' attorneys advised him against appearing in court today, saying it could prevent him from having a fair trial and influence a potential jury pool.

Jones was transferred to a state prison in the Lexington area for his safety. He is said to be on suicide watch.

Jones is set to appear in court Nov. 13.

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Normal Timothy Jones Jr, father who murdered his 5 children, thought they were going to 'kill him'.

Post by Wrapitup on Wed Sep 24, 2014 12:51 pm

Timothy Ray Jr. of South Carolina said he killed his five young children because they 'were going to kill him, chop him up and feed him to the dogs,' according to a warrant released on Wednesday. crazy3

A south Carolina father who killed his five young children said he believed that his kids 'were going to kill him, chop him up and feed him to the dogs,' according to an arrest warrant released yesterday.

Police say that Timothy Ray Jones killed his children-aged eight, seven, six, two and one years old- at his home in Lexington, South Carolina then put their bodies in plastic trash bags and drove them around for nine days around the Southeast. (Can anyone say Casey Anthony??)

CBS reports that the warrant says that authorities found blood in his car and found handwritten notes about chopping up bodies after he was stopped at a DUI checkpoint in Mississippi on September 6.

Even though a warrant was released last week, Lexington County deputies kept some of the information hidden.

Daniel Jones, the district attorney of Smith County, Mississippi, who is not related to Jones Jr. says he thinks that the cuckolded father went crazy.
'I think he probably just went mad,' said the prosecutor

Jones faces charges for unlawful neglect of a child and he also faces five counts of murder.

Jones' attorney says he has been treated for mental illness in the past and they want a mental evaluation to performed on him as soon as possible.

Timothy Ray Jones Jr earned his computer engineering degree, worked at a $71,000-a-year job, had a wife of ten years and several young children.

Then, just over two years ago, he discovered his wife Amber was putting their children to bed in their South Carolina home and going to the neighbor's house and sleeping with the neighbor's 19-year-old son, according to divorce papers.

Jones moved out with the children and seemed friendly to his new neighbors, but began to withdraw to the point where the woman who lived next door thought he and his family had moved away.

Jones and his five children - aged eight, seven, six, two and one years old - disappeared a few weeks ago, but no one called police for days.

Authorities weren't convinced anything was wrong until they said an intoxicated, agitated Jones was stopped at a DUI checkpoint in Mississippi where officers found him alone, with blood and children's clothes in his SUV and the stench of death in the air.

He was described as 'high as a kite' on synthetic marijuana known as Spice, which is readily available in head shops and online.

Jones, 32, would lead investigators to his children's bodies, wrapped in five trash bags on an isolated Alabama hilltop, but it's still not clear why he killed his children, authorities said. Officials believe that he was acting alone.

The brothers and sisters were all murdered at the same time but it is unclear as to how the children were killed.

The father had told neighbors that he and his five children were moving to another state after he divorced from his wife and became their primary legal custodian.

Investigators said that they believed all five children had been killed together soon after they were taken from school and daycare on August 28. Autopsies were due to be performed last Thursday.

'Let it be known that people will come to their own conclusions and as parents we can understand that decision based on the circumstances,' the father said in a statement. 'But please remember that our Little Tim is a very loving father, brother and son.'
That was not the picture painted by Lewis McCarty, the acting sheriff in Jones Jr.'s home of Lexington County, South Carolina.

The lawman who started his career on patrol 50 years ago took a second to collect himself as he started to talk to reporters.
'I made a promise to these children's mother that I would bring these children home. And I was not going to go back on that promise,' McCarty said.

Jones is an ex-convict who went on a crime spree more than a decade ago in Illinois, prison documents and a family member confirmed on Thursday.
He was arrested on a cocaine possession charge March 30, 2001, in Carpentersville, Illinois.
Six months later, he was arrested for a crime spree that included stealing a car, burglary and passing forged checks, according to Michael Combs, chief of the criminal division of the McHenry County, Illinois, State's Attorney's Office. He was 19 years old at the time.

A dirt road leads up to the isolated spot in rural Alabama where Jones admitted he dumped the bodies of his five children in individual trash bags.

Divorce records listed the five children as Merah, eight; Elias, seven; Nahtahn, six; Gabriel, two, and Elaine Marie, one. Elaine Marie was born Abagail Elizabeth but the parents agreed to a name change, records show.

McCarty said the children were likely killed shortly after they were last seen in school and day care on August 28.

He didn't say how they were killed, or where, except that it wasn't in their home.

Jones put each child's body in its own trash bag and loaded the bodies into his Cadillac Escalade, McCarty said.

He drove hundreds of miles and crisscrossed several Southeastern states for days, apparently using bleach to try to mask the smell of the decomposing bodies, authorities said.

Fox reported that Jones was caught on surveillance camera making a stop at a Dunkin Donuts in Spartanburg, South Carolina on Labor Day. It is believed Jones had the bodies of his dead children in the truck at the time.

The suspect left his SUV by a dumpster as he went into the store to buy an iced coffee and six donuts, Fox claimed.

Jones stopped at an isolated hilltop in central Alabama and left them near Pine Apple, 20 miles off Interstate 65 and about 65 miles south of Montgomery, authorities said.
He then kept driving for several more hours until he reached a DUI checkpoint in Smith County, Mississippi, about 500 miles from his hometown.
An officer said he 'smelled the stench of death' along with chemicals used to make methamphetamine and synthetic marijuana. There was blood, bleach and maggots in the car.

A check of Jones' license plate showed his ex-wife had reported him and the children missing three days earlier when he failed to bring them over for visitation.

He slowly acknowledged what happened to his children, and led police to their bodies , authorities said. Only then did authorities go public with the case.

'We were trying to balance the children and the investigation against the releasing of information,' McCarty said.

Timothy Ray Jones Jr, 32, was charged with murder of his five children and says he believed they would 'murder him and feed him to the dogs'

South Carolina Law Enforcement Division Chief Mark Keel said authorities did not issue an Amber Alert because the case didn't meet the criteria - Jones had legal custody of his children.

Bob Lowery, a vice president at the National Center for Missing Exploited Children, agreed.
'The joint custody issue and his having primary custody does complicate the matter,' Lowery said. 'He has every right to have those children.' (OMG!! He had Every right to have them and brutally murdered them!!)

Jones graduated with a degree in computer engineering from Mississippi State in 2011. Records from his October 2013 divorce show he was working for Intel at the time and the company confirmed he was still employed there when he disappeared.

The court records also showed a troubled life, both for Jones and his children. The divorce included multiple allegations of adultery against Jones' wife Amber, including accusations she sneaked over to her neighbor's home after putting the kids to bed.

A therapist who saw Jones during the divorce described him as 'highly intelligent' and responsible, yet emotionally devastated and angry over his wife's actions.

Jones got primary custody of the five children after the divorce and moved from one ramshackle mobile home to another in Lexington.

His wife didn't work outside the home or have a driver's license, according to court divorce records. She moved in with the neighbor.

At first he was friendly and waved at neighbors and his children played outside. But they all slowly started disappearing from view, said neighbor Dorothy Wood.

'I didn't even hear them playing outside anymore. I thought they had moved,' Wood said.
Food and other garbage were piled up outside Jones' mobile home south of Lexington. The yard was overgrown, with broken toys strewn about.

A sign on front door said, 'Is there life after death? Trespass here and find out' with a photo of a gun.

In Lexington, there was an abuse complaint against Jones lodged on August 7, but when deputies and an official with the Department of Social Services went out to the house, they interviewed the children and didn't see anything to alarm them. Officials wouldn't say who made the complaint.

The children's mother, Jones' ex-wife, is in shock and distraught, McCarty told reporters.
'I want you to know that she lost five vital body parts,' he said. 'A very nice person, a very sweet lady.'

Marlene Hyder and her husband, Johnny Hyder, said Jones and his wife moved into the house next to the family about seven years ago in Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina, 25 miles west of Columbia.

Johnny Hyder said the children were often dressed in dirty clothes and were seen home at all hours of the day because Tim Jones had said he didn't believe in the public schools. Hyder said Jones was constantly looking for a reason to argue and often threatened to call the police.

He said Jones approached him with a gun on his hip one day and was angry about something, but Hyder couldn't remember what it was. When Hyder said he was going to call police, he said Jones told him it was only a BB gun.

Marlene Hyder said Jones threatened to kill one of their dogs when it briefly went onto his property.
She said: 'He was a nut'.

Mrs Hyder said she also remembered a day when one of the Jones' younger children came over to the Hyders' house and tried to drink out of one of their outdoor spigots.
He was dirty and disheveled and ran back to his house when she tried to speak to him, she said.

A 'no trespassing' sign was posted near the driveway of a house where the Hyders said Tim Jones' ex-wife still lived with the other neighbor.

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Normal Re: A Fractured Life, a Failed Marriage and 5 Small Bodies in Alabama. Timothy R. Jones Jr., 32, is expected to face murder charges.

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